DANUM VALLEY

ONE OF THE LAST UNDISTURBED RAINFORESTS

Danum Valley

Danum Valley Conservation Area is a 438 square kilometres tract of relatively undisturbed lowland dipterocarp forest in Sabah, Malaysia. The area holds unique status in the sense that before it became a conservation area there were no human settlements within the area, meaning that hunting, logging and other human interference was non-existent, making the area almost unique. It is managed by Yayasan Sabah for conservation, research, education, and habitat restoration training purposes.

Danum Valley Conservation Area is dominated by dipterocarp tress, with the canopy reaching a height of over 70 metres in some places. Some 90% of the Conservation Area is classified as dipterocarp forest, with the remaining 10% being low canopy, sub-montane forest mainly found on Mount Danum in the heart of the Conservation Area.

The rare Wallace Flying Frog, soft shelled turtles, skinks, vipers, more than 40 species of fishes and a profusion of butterflies, such as the spectacular Rajah Brooke, can be seen, as well as more than 120 species of mammals including the 10 species of primates. Notably, the Conservation Area and its surrounding are an important habitat for Orang Utan and, due in part to minimal hunting pressure, is particularly rich in other large mammals including the Bornean pygmy elephant, banteng, Malayan sun bear, clouded leopard, bearded pig and five species of deer. Danum Valley also provides one of the last refuges in Sabah for the critically endangered Sumatran rhinoceros. Bird diversity is very high as more than 300 species of bird have been recorded, including the Bulwer's pheasant, seven species of pittas, the Borneo Bristlehead and all eight species of hornbill found in Borneo. Activities offered are jungle treks, river swimming, bird watching, night jungle tours and excursions to nearby logging sites and timber mills.